Fall 1989, Volume 6.2
Notes on Contributors

NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS

KATHRYN R. ASHWORTH (B.A., Brigham Young U) has completed one book of poetry, To Live in a House, and is working on another, When the Angel Comes from the Right. Her work has appeared in BYU Studies, Dialogue, Ensign, Gila Review, Rocky Mountain Review of Language and Literature, BYU Today, and Sunstone.

KRISTI DUDLESTON, a senior at Weber State College, is majoring in Visual Communications/Design. Her cover design was selected over several submitted by advanced graphic design students.

ANNIE FINCH (M.A., U of Houston), a doctoral candidate at Stanford University, is poetry editor of Sequoia. Her poems and critical essays have appeared in South Dakota Review, Kansas Quarterly, PMLA, Cumberland Poetry Review, and Legacy.

MILES E. FRIEND (Ph.D., U of Georgia) is an Associate Professor of Art His-tory and Theory at Idaho State University. His book reviews and articles have appeared in The Journal of Aesthetic Education and The Southeastern College Conference Journal.

ALLAN JOHNSTON (Ph.D., U of California_Davis) is a Lecturer in English at UC_Davis. His poetry has appeared in South Florida Poetry Review, Asylum, Green Fuse, Redstart, The MacGuffin, California Quarterly, and Shooting Star Review.

WILLIAM R. KANOUSE (M.A., Rutgers U; M.F.A., Temple U) teaches at Temple University and Rutgers University. His most recent publications have appeared in San JosZ Studies, Nebraska Review, Proof Rock, Alaska Quarterly Review, Footwork, Midway Review, and Oak Square.

WILLIAM KLOEFKORN (M.S., Emporia State U) teaches in the English Department at Nebraska Wesleyan University in Lincoln. His poetry recently appeared in Georgia Review, Laurel Review, and Zone 3. Poetry collections include Not Such a Bad Place to Be, Alvin Turner As Farmer, A Life Like Mine, Houses and Beyond, and his newest, Drinking the Tin Cup Dry, will be published by White Pine Press, Fredonia, New York.

VICTOR LUFTIG (Ph.D., Stanford U) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Yale University. His work sppears in Virginia Woolf Miscellany, The Byron Journal, and James Joyce Quarterly.

PHILIP F. NOTARIANNI (Ph.D., U of Utah) is the coordinator of the museum program at the Utah State Historical Society. He spent the 1987-88 academic year on a Fulbright Research Grant in Italy. His work has appeared in The Family and Community Life of Italian Americans and Utah Folklife Newsletter. He has edited Carbon County: Eastern Utah's Industrialized Island (1981) and Faith, Hope, and Prosperity: The Tintic Mining District (1982).

ADEN ROSS (Ph.D., U of Utah), playwright and poet, is a Lecturer in Humanities and Honors at Westminster College, Salt Lake City. Her poetry has appeared in Poetry Northwest, Pembroke Magazine, Kansas Quarterly, and The Centennial Review. Seven of her plays have been produced in Utah, Louisiana, and off-Broadway.

RICH SCHWEITZER (M.A., Georgetown U) served as a legislative intern in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1988 and is currently researching a book-length manuscript on religion and World War I.

SUKHBIR SINGH (Ph.D., U of Hyderabad) is currently a Lecturer in the English Department, Osmania University, Hyderabad, India. He has been published in several Indian and American journals, including Indian Journal of American Studies, Notes on Contemporary Literature, Panjab University Research Bulletin, and The Madras Review of English Studies.

STEVEN F. WALKER (Ph.D., Harvard U) is an Associate Professor of Comparative Literature at Rutgers University. His latest publications include A Cure for Love: A Generic Study of the Pastoral Idyll (1987) and "Vivekananda and American Occultism" in The Occult in America: New Historical Perspectives, edited by Kerr and Crow.

GENE WASHINGTON (Ph.D., U of Missouri) is a Professor of English at Utah State University. His articles have appeared in CCC, English Journal, Technical Writing Teacher, Swift Studies, and Acta Victoriana. His short stories have been featured in New Mexico Humanities Review, Big Two-Hearted, and Nexus.

MARK WOLLAEGER (Ph.D., Yale U) is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at Yale University. His work appears in Milton's Studies and James Joyce Quarterly. He is currently under contract to Stanford University for a forthcoming book titled Joseph Conrad and the Fictions of Skepticism.